Next Stage Of Health Law Triggers Concern, Confusion


Obamacare Protest at Supreme Court

Obamacare Protest at Supreme Court (Photo credit: southerntabitha)

News outlets report on the confusion that continues to surround
the health law, especially as key provisions are about to take effect.
Meanwhile, officials and activists strategize about how to educate
consumers about their options.

Georgia Health News: Concern, Confusion Over The Next Stage Of Reform

In six months, Jimmy Rowalt will no longer have health insurance. For
the past two and a half years, the 25-year-old Athens resident has
worked at Highwire Lounge without worrying about the job’s lack of
health benefits. Now he’s a manager there, working 45 to 55 hours a
week. A rule allowing young adults to remain on their parents’ health
insurance policies until age 26 was one of the first provisions of the
Affordable Care Act to go into effect, in September 2010. … Rowalt’s
options will be meager after his October birthday, when he will be
dropped by his parents’ insurance company (Murphy, 4/22).

CT Mirror: Strategizing On Helping The Uninsured With Health Care Reform

As the country gears up to launch the Affordable Health Act, one of the
most difficult tasks will be to sell it to uninsured people who may have
never heard of the word “co-pay” or know what a primary care physician
is. That was the message of Alta Lash, a Connecticut community organizer
who was one of several speakers from across the nation at a daylong
roundtable discussion Monday on how to promote health equity through
“Obamacare.” The event attracted about 200 policymakers, social workers,
physicians and researchers to the Mark Twain House in Hartford for a
discussion of how to eliminate health disparities through the expanded
coverage that will take effect in January (Merritt, 4/22).

CNN Money: Millions Eligible For Obamacare Subsidies, But Most Don’t Know It

Nearly 26 million Americans could be eligible for health insurance
subsidies next year, but most don’t know it. That’s because relatively
few people are familiar with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, aka
“Obamacare,” that will provide tax credits to low- and middle-income
consumers to help them purchase health coverage through state-run
insurance exchanges (Luhby, 4/23).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

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What The Health Law’s Future Holds


English: President Barack Obama, Vice Presiden...

English: President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and senior staff, react in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, as the House passes the health care reform bill. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Topics: Health Costs, Politics, Health Reform

Nov 19, 2012

Even with the election in the rear view mirror, efforts to implement the health care law will continue to face challenges. Meanwhile, experts discuss what steps must be taken to control health care costs and to educate the public about the health overhaul.

The Hill: Five ‘ObamaCare‘ Battles To Watch
Republicans aren’t going to repeal “ObamaCare” in the next four years, but there’s still plenty of room for both political fights and policy changes. Republicans have begun over the past two weeks to acknowledge — albeit grudgingly — that President Obama’s reelection took repeal off the table for the next four years. Conservatives have responded by stepping up the pressure on Republican governors to stand in the law’s way as much as possible at the state level, and governors do have considerable power over how the law is implemented. In Washington, deflated partisan rancor over the Affordable Care Act could be a blessing to industry groups with smaller, more targeted complaints about the law. Republican lawmakers and healthcare lobbyists say smaller fixes are more realistic if every minor issue doesn’t blow up into a full-scale war over ObamaCare, and the appetite for that war is finally starting to wane (Baker, 11/18).

The Wall Street Journal: Remaking Health Care: Change The Way Providers Are Paid
In the debate over the nation’s finances, health care is one of the biggest items on the agenda. How do we bring down soaring costs as more people get coverage and more baby boomers head into retirement? The Wall Street Journal’s Laura Landro moderated the task-force discussion on remaking health care (Landro, 11/19).

Politico: McClellan: Public Needs Education On Obamacare
Mark McClellan, who helped implement the Medicare prescription drug benefit for President George W. Bush, says the two parties should separate their political battles over Obamacare from the need for broad public education about how the law will affect ordinary people. Now at The Brookings Institution, McClellan was the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administrator when the largely GOP-designed drug benefit was rolled out from 2003 to 2006. He says the two parties had very strong differences over the prescription drug law but were able to have two parallel tracks — one fighting about the policy and one helping to explain what it would mean to a constituent (Kenen, 11/19).

Dr. Mark B. McClellan http://www.fda.gov/oc/co...

Dr. Mark B. McClellan http://www.fda.gov/oc/commissioners/mcclellan.html (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.