Norquist Aims to Stop Internet Sales Tax Legislation


English: Grover Norquist at a political confer...

English: Grover Norquist at a political conference in Orlando, Florida. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Christopher Hitchens at a party at th...

English: Christopher Hitchens at a party at the house of Grover Norquist following the CPAC convention in January 2004 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Official photo cropped of United Stat...

English: Official photo cropped of United States Senator and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuesday, 23 Apr 2013 02:07 PM

By David Yonkman, Washington Correspondent  –

Internet sales-tax legislation racing through the Senate is likely to

face roadblocks when it moves to the House, anti-tax activist Grover

Norquist told Newsmax Tuesday.

“The reason we have a House and Senate is when you rush something

through one body, you have a chance to think it through in the other

body,” said Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform.“We’re

making the case on the House side of either seriously amending it or

even stopping it.”

The Senate is likely this week to pass the bill, which would greatly

expand the ability of states to collect sales taxes across state lines

on online purchases. Under current law, states can collect sales taxes

from retailers only if they have a physical presence in the state — a

store, warehouse, or office.

The Marketplace Fairness Act would allow states to collect taxes even if

the retailer does not have a physical presence in the state.

That’s just wrong, according to Norquist, who describes the legislation

as a massive expansion of taxing authority over businesses that have no

recourse in the matter.

“You should only be taxing people who can vote for you or against you,” Norquist said.

The Senate voted 74 to 20 on Monday to clear the Internet sales tax bill

for consideration on the floor, but on final passage it will have at

least one high-ranking Republican dissenter.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky cited the difficulty

for businesses to comply with the different tax codes in all the areas

where their customers reside. McConnell says that creates an enormous

advantage to large retailers who can afford such costs over smaller

businesses.

“If states decide they need this revenue, they should keep in mind the

tremendous burden they’ll be placing on the little guys who do so much

to drive this economy,” McConnell said in remarks on the Senate floor.

“In my view, the federal government should be looking for ways to help,

not hurt, these folks.”

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

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Study Finds Health Care Spending Will Rebound When Economy Picks Up


Responses to the question: "For future pr...

Responses to the question: “For future presidential elections, would you support or oppose changing to a system in which the president is elected by direct popular vote, instead of by the electoral college?” Data from Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation-Harvard University Survey of Political Independents, conducted May-June 2007, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/interactives/independents/post-kaiser-harvard-topline.pdf (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The analysis by The Kaiser Family Foundation says the slowdown in
health spending over the past several years was largely driven by the
economic malaise.

Los Angeles Times: Study: Growth In Health Spending, Curbed By Recession, To Rebound

A new study attributes a slowdown in U.S. healthcare spending to the
recent recession and predicts more rapid growth as the economy
strengthens. The report issued Monday by the Kaiser Family Foundation
seeks to shed light on the reasons behind the recent drop-off. The
analysis found that economic factors related to the recession accounted
for 77% of the reduced growth in national healthcare spending, which
totaled an estimated $2.8 trillion in 2012 (Terhune, 4/22).

The Washington Post’s WonkBlog: Here’s Why Health-Care Costs Are Slowing

The answer has huge implications for the federal budget, which now faces
threats of really fast growth in Medicare, Medicaid and other health
programs. If those programs grow like they have for the past few years —
at the same rate as the rest of the economy — then that frees up lots
of funds for whatever other investments the federal government wants to
make (Kliff, 4/22).

The Hill: Study Predicts Rise In Healthcare Cost Growth By 2019

A stronger U.S. economy will contribute to a rise in the growth of
healthcare costs over the next six years, ending the current
record-breaking slowdown, according to a new study. The Kaiser Family
Foundation (KFF) predicted that by 2019, annual healthcare cost growth
will be closer to historic averages — over 7 percent compared to 3.9
percent between 2009 and 2011 (Viebeck,4/22).

CQ HealthBeat: Nation’s Health Spending Problem Remains Unsolved, Kaiser Analysts Say

Speculation that the nation’s health spending problem has somehow been
solved or cut down to size is unrealistic, says a new Kaiser Family
Foundation study that concludes 77 percent of the slowdown stems from
the weak economy. … But the analysts had a bit of good news. They said
the chilling effect on individual health spending due to the weak
economy will continue for a few more years (Reichard, 4/22).

(KHN is an editorially independent project of The Kaiser Family Foundation.)

Meanwhile, a different analysis is released on health issues–

Reuters: S&P Sees Pension Funding Burden Of Nonprofit Healthcare

Pension liabilities, expenses and contributions remain a burden on U.S.
not-for-profit hospitals despite improvements in the investments used to
fund the retirement systems, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services
said on Monday. Large pension funding demands will likely “be a drag on
the sector for several years,” it added (Lambert and Trokie, 4/22).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

Some Boston Marathon Bomb Victims Will Face Insurance Coverage Limits


Boston Marathon

Boston Marathon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Payments for prosthetics, rehabilitation and a range of other
treatments may fall outside some insurance limits and could continue
long into the future.

The New York Times: For Wounded, Daunting Cost; For Aid Fund, Tough Decisions

Many of the wounded could face staggering bills not just for the trauma
care
they received in the days after the bombings, but for prosthetic
limbs
, lengthy rehabilitation and the equipment they will need to
negotiate daily life with crippling injuries. Even those with health
insurance may find that their plan places limits on specific services,
like physical therapy or psychological counseling (Goodnough, 4/22).

Politico: Coverage Limits Are Harsh Reality For Amputees

Those who lost limbs in the Boston Marathon bombings now need care to
learn to navigate the world in a new way — and navigate a thorny area of
health care coverage, too. In the case of the Boston bombings, pledges
and offers of support have poured in to help with the health care costs
of the 14 people who reportedly lost all or part of a limb. But for some
amputees, covering the staggering cost for prosthetics care can be a
struggle (Smith, 4/23).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

Proposal Would Require Insurers To Report Health Law Taxes


English: , member of the United States Senate....

English: , member of the United States Senate. Español: John Cornyn, un senador del Senado de los Estados Unidos (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The measure’s sponsor, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, bills it as a
way to educate consumers about how the health law’s benefits are funded.

The Hill: Insurers Would Report ObamaCare Taxes Under GOP Bill

A new bill from Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) would require health insurers
to disclose taxes they pay under ObamaCare to policyholders. In a
statement Monday, Cornyn touted the measure as a way to educate
consumers about how the Affordable Care Act’s benefits are funded
(4/22).

Also in the news, health law opponents are pressing for repeal of the
health law’s medical device tax, among other provisions, in
comprehensive tax reform legislation –

Roll Call: Health Law Tax Foes Find Hope In Overhaul Effort

Proponents of doing away with provisions such as the medical-device tax
and the annual fee on health insurance companies say they already have
bipartisan support for their repeal legislation. But the efforts still
will face health care politics and the need for significant offsets,
making their inclusion far from certain as lawmakers work toward
comprehensive tax legislation that can pass in both chambers (Attias,
4/22).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

Next Stage Of Health Law Triggers Concern, Confusion


Obamacare Protest at Supreme Court

Obamacare Protest at Supreme Court (Photo credit: southerntabitha)

News outlets report on the confusion that continues to surround
the health law, especially as key provisions are about to take effect.
Meanwhile, officials and activists strategize about how to educate
consumers about their options.

Georgia Health News: Concern, Confusion Over The Next Stage Of Reform

In six months, Jimmy Rowalt will no longer have health insurance. For
the past two and a half years, the 25-year-old Athens resident has
worked at Highwire Lounge without worrying about the job’s lack of
health benefits. Now he’s a manager there, working 45 to 55 hours a
week. A rule allowing young adults to remain on their parents’ health
insurance policies until age 26 was one of the first provisions of the
Affordable Care Act to go into effect, in September 2010. … Rowalt’s
options will be meager after his October birthday, when he will be
dropped by his parents’ insurance company (Murphy, 4/22).

CT Mirror: Strategizing On Helping The Uninsured With Health Care Reform

As the country gears up to launch the Affordable Health Act, one of the
most difficult tasks will be to sell it to uninsured people who may have
never heard of the word “co-pay” or know what a primary care physician
is. That was the message of Alta Lash, a Connecticut community organizer
who was one of several speakers from across the nation at a daylong
roundtable discussion Monday on how to promote health equity through
“Obamacare.” The event attracted about 200 policymakers, social workers,
physicians and researchers to the Mark Twain House in Hartford for a
discussion of how to eliminate health disparities through the expanded
coverage that will take effect in January (Merritt, 4/22).

CNN Money: Millions Eligible For Obamacare Subsidies, But Most Don’t Know It

Nearly 26 million Americans could be eligible for health insurance
subsidies next year, but most don’t know it. That’s because relatively
few people are familiar with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, aka
“Obamacare,” that will provide tax credits to low- and middle-income
consumers to help them purchase health coverage through state-run
insurance exchanges (Luhby, 4/23).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

Competition Key Ingredient To Success Of State Health Exchanges


Stateline reports that even some of the strongest health exchange
enthusiasts are concerned that some states will still only have limited
insurance choices for consumers. Meanwhile, in other news, the Arkansas
Medicaid expansion model gains momentum, Florida’s efforts face
continued complications, Arizona’s expansion standoff continues and the
Missouri Senate rejects the concept. Also, the shape of Ohio’s
compromise exchange is beginning to emerge.

Stateline: Lack Of Competition Might Hamper Health Exchange

The White House sums up the central idea behind the health care
exchanges in the new federal health law with a simple motto: “more
choices, greater competition.” But even some stalwart supporters of the
Affordable Care Act worry that in many states, people won’t have a lot
of health insurance choices when the exchanges launch in October. Health
economists predict that in states that already have robust competition
among insurance companies—states such as Colorado, Minnesota and
Oregon—the exchanges are likely to stimulate more. But according to
Linda Blumberg of the Urban Institute, “There are still going to be
states with virtual monopolies” (Vestal, 4/23).

Health News Florida: ‘Private Option‘ Plan, Florida Model, Passes In Ark.

Arkansas’ state legislature passed a model plan to expand Medicaid last
week, even though its Legislature is dominated by Republicans and the
measure had to pass by a three-quarters vote, the Associated Press
reports. The Arkansas plan is the model for Florida state Sen. Joe
Negron’s plan, which would accept an estimated $51 billion in federal
funds over 10 years to expand insurance to about 1 million of the
state’s low-income uninsured (Gentry, 4/22).

Miami Herald: Legislators Poised To Adjourn With No Medicaid Plan

As the clock winds down on the legislative session, Florida lawmakers
are sending signals that they are likely to adjourn without resolving
the issue of whether to accept federal Medicaid money to insure the
state’s poorest residents. “It’s not something you put together in a
week,”’ said Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, chairman of the Senate
Rules Committee and a close adviser to Senate President Don Gaetz.
“It’s a very big, complicated issue and these issues take some time.” He
said he does not expect there would be political repercussions if the
Republican-led Legislature waits another year (Klash, 4/22).

Arizona Republic: Brewer, GOP In Medicaid Standoff

Three months after she stunned political observers and made her case for
expanding Medicaid coverage in Arizona, Gov. Jan Brewer is no closer to
reaching agreement with Republican legislative leaders on the issue,
which has driven a wedge through GOP ranks and is delaying work on the
state budget. By most accounts at the Capitol, Brewer has just enough
votes in the House and Senate to get expansion approved. Even some
lawmakers who oppose the plan predict it eventually will pass, owing in
large part to the power of the governor’s veto pen and her reputation
for tenacity, as well as pressure from top-flight lobbyists and
heart-tugging health-care crisis stories (Reinhart, 4/22).

The Associated Press: Mo. Senate Votes Down Federal Medicaid Expansion

Republican senators have made it clear that there will be no Medicaid
expansion in Missouri this session. The Republican-led Senate voted down
a Democratic attempt Monday night to insert $890 million of federal
funds into Missouri’s budget to expand Medicaid eligibility to an
estimated 260,000 lower-income adults (4/23).

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s Medicaid Expansion Alternative Could Use Private Insurance

For the first time since Gov. John Kasich won national attention by
supporting Medicaid expansion, a clear picture is emerging on how the
Republican governor’s compromise with federal regulators could work.
Some uninsured Ohioans would be enrolled in the state’s traditional
Medicaid program, while others would sign up for private health
insurance using federal funding, said Greg Moody, director of Ohio’s
Office of Health Transformation. The proposal, which Kasich hopes to
sell to GOP lawmakers reluctant to support an outright Medicaid
expansion, has been dubbed “The Ohio Plan.” And it differs from the
standard federal expansion program on one crucial point: It puts some
enrollees in the private insurance market (Tribble, 4/22).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary
of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The
full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.

John Kasich

John Kasich (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Louisiana Health Secretary Submits Resignation


, member of the United States House of Represe...

, member of the United States House of Representatives. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Topics: States, Medicaid, Politics

Apr 01, 2013

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal‘s health secretary — Bruce Greenstein — is resigning amid a probe into a Medicaid contract he awarded to a former employer.

The Associated Press: La. Gov. Jindal’s Health Secretary Resigns As Probes Continue Into Medicaid Contract
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal’s health secretary and close ally, Bruce Greenstein, is resigning amid ongoing state and federal investigations into the awarding of a Medicaid contract to a company where Greenstein once worked, officials said Friday. The Jindal administration canceled the nearly $200 million contract with Maryland-based CNSI last week after details leaked of a federal grand jury subpoena involving the contract award (3/29).

New Orleans Times Picayune: DHH Secretary Bruce Greenstein Resigns In Wake Of Federal Investigation
Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Secretary Bruce Greenstein has resigned, a statement from Gov. Bobby Jindal’s office confirmed Friday. Speculation Greenstein would resign was rampant after news broke he allegedly used his influence as department head to secure a contract for a former employer. … Asked whether the hospitals secretary was forced out, Jindal spokesman Sean Lansing said in an email, “The governor did not ask Bruce to resign.” He later added that no one in the administration or among Jindal’s advisers asked Greenstein to resign (McGaughy, 3/29).

This is part of Kaiser Health News‘ Daily Report – a summary of health policy coverage from more than 300 news organizations. The full summary of the day’s news can be found here and you can sign up for e-mail subscriptions to the Daily Report here. In addition, our staff of reporters and correspondents file original stories each day, which you can find on our home page.